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Lyn Stoffels

Lyn has been working with clay for over 20 years and uses handbuilt, wheel-thrown and altered form techniques. She makes a wide range of pottery from pendants to bowls and platters to wall art. The common theme in all her pieces is a touch of the coast. She uses stamped and rolled impressions of shells and seaweed and carvings of herons, salmon and dolphins. She combines her glazes to depict colors of the sea, sand and sky. All of her stoneware pottery is oven, microwave and dishwasher safe.

Lyn lives and works out of her home studio in Powell River, B.C. “Living on the coast and being in nature provides me with a wealth of ideas and inspiration. I take these ideas back to my studio and work and play with them.”



In the past couple of years Lyn has been drawn to work with the technique of smoke-fired pottery.  “The rich red tones of the clay contrasted with black slip designs are burnished to a natural shine. I love the warmth and beauty of the bare clay with all its subtle impressions and the unpredictable patterns from the fire.”  Smoke-fired pottery is food-safe but because it is fired to a lower temperature it is more fragile and not intended for general use.

Many people and life experiences have contributed to and influenced my work. It is constantly changing as one idea grows into another.

Patrice Plank

 Patrice Plank, who calls Victoria, B.C., Canada her home, has been an artist most of her life.  Inspired by nature, Parice tries to capture the beauty surrounding her.  Her favorite subjects include birds, butterflies, dragonflies, animals, marine life and flowers.
Orange Glow

Orange Glow

In the past her primary media was traditionally oils and acrylics.  She has since fallen in love with clayboard scratch art and has been dedicated to this medium for the past seven years.  Patrice scratches her original art into the surface of the clayboard with very delicate tools and using a magnifier, reveals the design in exquisite detail in shades of black and white. She then paints her art with special watercolors or acrylics.

Her scratch art has won numerous awards and her art is included in private collections throughout the world.




Little Jewels

Little Jewels

Jennifer Kivari

My mosaic art can inspire, expand perspectives, or perhaps remind us of our spirit and truth we already know. By creating art subjects rich with feeling, memories, humor, and meaningful messages along with combining and weaving layer upon layer under and above the glass results in a powerful medium full of clarity and depth. I whole-heartedly believe we all have a purpose on this earth, something of value and significance we can share with others.  We are led through our life time by our inner learning creature, the playful spiritual being that is our real self. I want to share a part of myself and my ability and give back to the world; one art piece at a time…


This award-winning artwork reflects and highlights the beauty in the world around us, and has been featured throughout Vancouver Island, the Lower Mainland, Canada; and the United States of America.

Joanna Asha Roznowski

I am a painter and photographer. With colour, contrast, texture, and shape I bring out vivid and dynamic compositions that echo my emotions about the environment. The technique I use of pouring and moving the paint across a canvas makes it possible to easily follow the direction of spilt acrylic paint.


For the last few months I traveled with my digital camera documenting the natural environment on Vancouver Island. Each of the unique organic forms I found, juxtapositions of colours and contrasts was in the constant growth and revival. I tried to imagine what is beneath the ocean floor, what is the particularly the nature of landforms in the area, what can be discover, what kind of plants

inhabited the space, what is the history of the place, what is abstract and what is real? My current work reflects fascination with the plants’ unique structures including their forms and tissues from the microscopic to the macroscopic visions. On my paintings representational images of various plants and abstract shapes are filled with energy, which, as in nature, balances between the concentration of a form and its synthetic partition. The embryophytes and hydrophytic plants blend and permeate each other forming multi-layered compositions.

Joanna Asha Roznowski holds an MFA from the University of  Waterloo, a BFA from NSCAD University, and Diploma in Fine Arts from the Vancouver Island University.

Ellen Statz

Ellen was born and raised in the small coastal community of Campbell River BC, on Vancouver Island.  She is the daughter of a commercial fisherman and has a long and direct connection with the sea and with nature which inspires her whimsical forms and designs.

Leaf Vase

Leaf Vase

Wild Elderberry Plate

Wild Elderberry Plate

Ellen discovered clay in 1984 while enrolled in the Fine Arts Diploma Program at Malapsina College in Nanaimo, BC.  She continued here art education and work in Raku at North island College.

“My greatest pleasures come from allowing the clay to take me places I would not venture into on my own.  The unpredictable and spontaneous nature of Raku produces  positive feedback which shows no sign of abating”.  Ellen’s work has moved through a number of themes ranging from a fixation with alligators to her current interest in botanical textures and impressions.

She currently lives and works in Campbell River where she makes Raku pottery and teaches classes in her home studio.  Ellen’s work is held in collections throughout the world and she enjoys an enthusiastic local following.

  The Raku Process….

After a rapid firing of about 30 minutes glowing hot pots are quickly removed from the kiln and placed into metal containers lined with combustible materials (like shredded paper) .  A  lid cuts off the oxygen creating a “reducing” atmosphere.  In this reducing atmosphere, smoke and fire work their magic, making each piece “one of a kind”

Handle your Raku with care—after all, it has had a difficult birth!

Raku is not watertight or food safe.  Over time, direct sunlight may affect colours.  Clean with a soft cloth.

Desiree Bond

Desiree Bond

Desiree was born in Whitehorse, Yukon Territory and has called various places home, including Toronto, Vancouver, Calgary and finally Victoria.

In 1989, she became an active member of the Calgary chapter of the Federation of Canadian Artists.  Desiree enrolled in the Alberta College of Art in 1992, where she studied until getting married and starting a family.  Now that her children are more independent, she is able to paint full time.

Desiree’s focus is to achieve a fresh and effortless feel to her paintings.  Confident brush strokes and strong colors characterize her work.  Desiree paints predominantly in liquid acrylics and enjoys working on both large and small canvases.  The west coast of Vancouver Island provides endless inspiration for her landscapes and floral.

Desiree has participated in many Federation art shows in Calgary, Victoria, and Vancouver.  Other juried shows include the Summer Exhibition and Winter Small Works Shows at the Art Gallery of Greater Victoria, the Sooke Fine Art Show and the Sidney Fine Art Show. Desiree has also participated in the Art Gallery of Greater Victoria’s annual Moss Street paint-in.


"West Coast Path" $650.00

“West Coast Path” $650.00

"Stems" $350.00

“Stems” $350.00

"Gold Stream" $2,500.00

“Gold Stream” $2,500.00

In the last year, Desiree has been honored with three awards at the Federation Gallery, including first prize in the Small, Smaller, Smallest show in November 2008.

Jason Hart

He was born in Ontario, where he lived in Lake Huron. He studied leather work and became a leather carver.

At the age of 23, Jason moved to Victoria, B.C. to study and learn the art of native wood carving. With the help and guidance of a Haida carver by the name of Randy Reid, he has achieved renowned success. He now carves in mediums of Red and Yellow Cedar, Alder and bone.

He is the sign of the Raven, hence his favourite carving.

Red Cedar Chest

Cedar Chest

Isabelle Groc

Isabelle Groc is a Vancouver-based writer and photographer. She covers environmental issues, urban affairs, conservation, wildlife, and the relationships between people and their environments.

In her nature photography, Isabelle is interested in conveying a sense of intimacy and connection with the animals. She often focuses on unusual details of species or offers extreme close-ups.

In her writing, Isabelle reports on human activities that either endanger ecosystems or contribute to protecting them. She believes that photography and reporting are equally important in telling stories about our complex relationship to nature.



Originally from the South of France, Isabelle has lived in New York and Boston before settling down in Vancouver, Canada. She has a master’s degree in Journalism from Columbia University and a master’s degree in city planning from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Her photos and articles have appeared in various publications in Canada, the United States, and France.

Isabelle has won several photography competitions including the CBC David Suzuki 2005 Nature in Focus Environmental Photography contest. She is the recipient of the Great Waters Institute fellowship from the Institutes for Journalism and Natural Resources, and the Scripps Howard Institute on the Environment fellowship. She is a finalist of the 2007 BBC Wildlife Photographer of the Year Competition.


She volunteers for several environmental organizations in British Columbia, including the Vancouver Aquarium Marine Science Centre and the Stanley Park Ecological Society.

Allan Blyth

Allan Blyth educated his eye in the techniques and craftsmanship of carving at a very early age. Born and raised in Victoria, British Columbia, he spent hours as a child watching master carvers restore ancient totem poles and house-posts destined for the Victoria Museum. In his 20s, Al was introduced to a master carver who became his teacher in the Kwagiulth style. He carved and painted as a hobby for many years, earning his living in the shipyards and the family business. When an industrial accident cut his career short, Al began carving full-time. He creates ceremonial masks, as well as bowls, boxes, walking sticks and feast dishes. Soon he will be incorporating metal casting, stone, bone, and other natural materials, in his works.





John Bellis

John was born in Masset on haida Gwaii of Haida origin.  He is the grandson of “Captain Andrew Brown” well known Argillite Carver from the Islands. About 10 years ago he started working with wood and continues to do so at his home in Sooke, B.C. where he now resides.

The Brentwood Box

The side of a single piece of Red Cedar which has been kerfed in three places, then steamed and bent into the box shape.  When dry, the kerfs are glued and the join is drilled and pegged.  The bottom is carefully fitted then glued, drilled and pegged.

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